The un/reality of death

I am currently creating a body of work exploring the finite reality of death as we experience it in life, alongside the imaginary potential the ‘world beyond’ has. I will explore death by playing with our perceptions of time and it’s limits. This work will be exhibited at the Rooms in Jan 2019. 

On the floor/a low base will be a series of dead ceramic hare sculptures. I am interested in creating a dead sculpture, of playing with the notion that sculpture could ever be alive. These Hare’s will have crystalline formations pulling out of them, through wounds, mouths, ears. Within these clear resin crystals will be bones. The crystals, lit from below, will grow together up like stalagmites above the viewer. There will be orbs of organic matter in resin. The Hare will bridge the bones (death) and the organic orbs (life). Within this installation a duration of time will physically inhabit the one space.

Ceramic dead Hare Maquetes- tests for for upcoming exhibition at the Rooms Gallery January 2019, Larger, more fully realized hares will be made for the exhibition.

Inspired by, ‘The Incredulity of Saint Thomas’ (Caravaggio)’ I will display a series of Watercolours made from observations &  photos I have taken during large animal autopsies. The paintings will contain the hands and tools of the pathologist in fine, tight detail. The Inside of the animal, organs and internal structure, will be intuitively drawn, building from observations of the shapes, patterns of the viscera. It will look very real in the detail, almost a scientific illustration, this detail will grow, evolve and spread across the paper. The insides will no longer be contained within an animal form we can understand. The evidence of death will be both proven and undermined.

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Playing with resin

I am not sure what I am going to do with all these orbs, they look like new world life starter kits to me, but I am a sci-fi geek. I really like the ones that are bursting out of their castings.
From left to right, grass, moss, cow parsley, jaw bone, dill seed head.